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Xbox Live down as Microsoft experiences ‘multiple’ service outages

Sharon Ross

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Xbox Live down as Microsoft experiences ‘multiple’ service outages

Microsoft’s Xbox Live service is experiencing issues today, marking the fourth time in recent weeks. Xbox One users are currently reporting problems with signing into Xbox Live, accessing friends, and joining parties. “We are aware that some users may be experiencing issues when attempting to sign in on Xbox One & Windows 10,” explains Microsoft

. “Our teams are aware & working on a fix. Please follow here & on our status page for updates.”

Microsoft says it’s also investigating issues affecting “multiple Microsoft 365 services,” suggesting the outage issues go further than just Xbox Live. Microsoft has experienced multiple outages with Xbox Live recently, and this is the fourth outage in recent weeks. Xbox Live was down for two hours last month, affecting party chat and online multiplayer.

It’s not clear what Microsoft 365 services are affected, and we’ve reached out to Microsoft for clarification on the issues.

Sharon Ross has been phenomenal in the success of Report Door. She is the super dedicated types, always glued to her computer. She talks less, but when it comes to work, she is behind none. She is a tech geek and contributes to the technology section of Report Door.

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South Korean cafe uses robotic baristas to comply with social distancing

Sharon Ross

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South Korean cafe uses robotic baristas to comply with social distancing

With its COVID-19 outbreak seemingly contained, South Korea may offer the rest of the world a glimpse of what society could look like after the pandemic ends — and it may include robotic baristas. According to Reuters

, a cafe in Daejeon, South Korea, is now using robots to prepare drinks and deliver them to customers. Proponents say the robots could encourage “distancing in daily life.”

The barista system consists of a robotic arm that prepares 60 different beverages and wheeled bots that deliver the drinks to customers. The system can communicate with other devices, contains self-driving tech to determine the best route around people and tables and communicates with customers via voice controls.

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You can now watch Quibi shows on a TV using AirPlay

Sharon Ross

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You can now watch Quibi shows on a TV using AirPlay

Short-form mobile video service Quibi now supports Apple’s AirPlay protocol, which means you’ll be able to stream content from Quibi on your phone to AirPlay-enabled TVs and devices.

Quibi is also “working hard” to have support for Chromecast available in June, according to Tom Conrad, chief product officer at Quibi. That should let Android users cast content from the Quibi app to their TVs as well, once it’s rolled out.

It first came to light that Quibi would be offering some sort of way to stream shows to TVs from the iOS app in a May 11th article in The New York Times, though at that time, it was unclear if Quibi would be using AirPlay.

Quibi’s app still has a number of limitations that make Quibi content difficult to share. Users can’t take screenshots, for example, meaning that it’s difficult for users to post screenshots from shows on social media. In an interview with The New York Times

, Katzenberg did say that users will soon be able to share Quibi content on social media, though it’s unclear exactly how, or if the restrictions on screenshots will be lifted.

Quibi, which launched on April 6th, has 1.3 million active users, the company informed The New York Times. That’s significantly lower than many competing streaming services. Disney Plus, by contrast, has nearly 55 million subscribers. To be fair, Disney Plus has been available since November 2019 — but it also beat Quibi on usage out of the gate, picking up more than 10 million subscribers on its first day.

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Qualcomm expects all-in-one 5G XR viewers in 1-4 years, glasses in 5-10

Sharon Ross

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Qualcomm expects all-in-one 5G XR viewers in 1-4 years, glasses in 5-10

Since Qualcomm provides chips and software for most of the world’s best known virtual and augmented reality headsets, it’s uniquely able to forecast the future of mixed reality hardware. Just ahead of this week’s Augmented World Expo, Qualcomm XR chief Hugo Swart used a Spatial holographic conference to brief media on how that future will likely play out. And though some of the major innovations are years rather than months away, the company is laying the groundwork today.

Over the next decade, mixed reality is widely expected to become a key transformative technology for both businesses and average customers, as VR and AR wearables enable users to work and play in hybrid digital/real-world spaces. While prior-generation accessories have been tethered to computers or used smartphones as displays, standalone XR devices and smartphone-tethered “XR viewers” are rapidly gathering steam, a process that’s expected to continue until lightweight standalone 5G XR glasses are available, potentially replacing phones.

Today, Qualcomm is publicly unveiling the XR Optimized certification program for Snapdragon smartphones, offering device makers XR viewer specs, supporting software, and a branding badge so customers will be able to easily identify phones compatible with the headsets. As of today, nine companies — ranging from Nreal

to Pico — are making compatible viewers, while seven smartphone OEMs and 15 major cellular operators are backing the initiative.

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Using USB cables for connectivity, these XR viewers will initially rely on smartphones for data, a practical necessity that could help move the entire category forward. Businesses and consumers will be able to make headset purchases from local stores, potentially with subsidized hardware and service bundle pricing. Qualcomm’s XR initiative is already being backed by Verizon in the U.S., five prominent European networks, and the top carriers in China, Japan, and South Korea.

The next step forward will be wirelessly tethered XR viewers, and Swart said Wi-Fi 6E will be used to let cable-free VR and AR viewers connect to smartphones and computers, relying on 6GHz spectrum as an alternative to 60GHz millimeter wave Wi-Fi. Over the next one to four years, cabled XR viewers will transition to fully wireless connections while still using host devices for processing and network (5G) connectivity. Standalone XR devices will become lighter and sleeker during the same period but won’t achieve true glasses-like form factors for a while.

Perhaps not surprisingly, Qualcomm expects that the next big step — standalone XR glasses that look like today’s spectacles but have their own processing and 5G capabilities — are five to 10 years off. While Swart didn’t get into the finer details of that timeline, it’s clear the underlying display, processing, and battery technologies that will enable lightweight XR glasses aren’t ready to converge in a consumer product yet, but annual advances in chip miniaturization and cellular power consumption are continuing to bring the dream closer to reality.

Hardware will only be part of the story, of course. Over the next few years, Qualcomm partners are working on complete XR ecosystems. Niantic is developing its own AR platform for world-scale gaming. And former HTC head Peter Chou has launched XRSpace, a company with XR hardware and Manova — a metaverse-like gathering place akin to Facebook Horizon — to connect users for various XR experiences. Consumer adoption of solutions on the road to completely standalone XR glasses remains a question mark. But interest in early standalone VR headsets like the Oculus Quest has been encouragingly strong over the past year.

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