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Twitch Acquires Internet Gaming Database Site (IGDB)

Sharon Ross

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Twitch is here with a mission to acquire the gaming database site

In case you don’t know ‘Twitch’ is owned by Amazon and is said to have made a smart move to improve its search capabilities and providing better direction for the viewers to reach the content they wish to see. The company is said to acquire IGDB, the Internet Games Database.

It was founded by Christian Frithiof and a team based in Gothenburg, in Sweden. The company is dedicated to combining all the significant information about games into a comprehensive resource for gamers everywhere.

IDGB sources its gaming content both via community contributors and automation. Due to this acquisition, IGDB’s database will now feed into Twitch’s search and discovery feature set, but this won’t impact the IGDB site in any way.

It’s been reported that the site contains helpful information for every game, such as its genre, platforms it supports, description of the game, its members, critics rating, general reviews, storyline, publisher, date of release, available game modes, characters and so much more.

The list doesn’t end here for one can even find less-common details such as how long it takes to play the game in question or the player perspective that the game offers, etc.

Talking about the latest updates about IGDB, in a recent blog post, IGDB made announcement saying that it’d be starting a “large scale migration of our backend, database, and hosting” and also mentioned, as I quote, that the service was “about to undergo some changes, some temporary and others more of permanent nature”.

In short, it decided to close down the ability for users to sign-up or to update their profiles, and it also closed down its pulse news, feed as well as recommendation features.

Sharon Ross has been phenomenal in the success of Report Door. She is the super dedicated types, always glued to her computer. She talks less, but when it comes to work, she is behind none. She is a tech geek and contributes to the technology section of Report Door.

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Google is sending Android 11 updates to some Pixel 4 owners early

Sharon Ross

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Google is sending Android 11 updates to some Pixel 4 owners early

They’ll now also be able to access controls for connected devices by holding the Power button, provided they switch on the option in Settings.

If they choose to, they can also enable bubble notifications under a new menu, which allows conversation alerts to show up as floating icons on top of other apps.

Unfortunately, the rollout seems to be unplanned, so those who haven’t gotten it will probably have to wait until the beta’s official release. Google doesn’t have a new date for its rollout yet, though: when the tech giant canceled its June 3rd launch event, it only said that it will be back with more details on Android 11 “soon.”

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Blackout Tuesday posts are drowning out vital information shared under the BLM hashtag

Sharon Ross

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Blackout Tuesday posts are drowning out vital information shared under the BLM hashtag

As part of a Blackout Tuesday protest originally organized by workers in the music industry, users on social media, particularly Instagram, are sharing images of black squares in solidarity with black victims of police violence. But many are tagging their posts with the hashtags #BlackLivesMatter and #BLM, obscuring a channel that’s being used to share vital information about protests, organization donations, and document police violence.

The singer Kehlani and rapper Chuck Inglish were among those to call out the problem, retweeting a video of an Instagram feed of black images shared under the #BLM hashtag.

As the video’s original poster noted: “once you click on the blm hashtag you’re directed to an overflow of black images, instead of other more useful content people could look at for information.” Another user said sharing black screens under the hashtags was “counter-productive … Amplify black voices WITHOUT silencing the movement.”

Other social media users urged anyone posting a black screen as part of the protest to simply remove the #BLM and #BlackLivesMatter hashtags from their posts.

“Stop posting black squares under the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag on Instagram,” wrote Twitter user Anthony James Williams. “It is intentionally and unintentionally hiding critical information we are using on the ground and online … Tell me how this helps Black folk. It doesn’t, and it in fact makes things a lot worse. Tell your friends and fam to stop.”

What’s being called the Blackout Tuesday (it’s also being called “Black Out Tuesday”) protest was originally organized by two black women working in the music industry: Jamila Thomas, senior director of marketing at Atlantic Records, and Brianna Agyemang, a former Atlantic executive who is now senior artist campaign manager at Platoon.

Using the hashtag #TheShowMustBePaused, Thomas and Agyemang called for members of the music industry to “take a beat for an honest reflective, and productive conversation about what actions we need to collectively take to support the black community.”

“The music industry is a multi-billion dollar industry. An industry that has profited predominately from Black Art,” write the pair at TheShowMustBePaused.com. “Our mission is to hold the industry at large, including major corporations + their partners who benefit from the efforts, struggles and success of Black people accountable.”

Many record labels, radio stations, and musicians have since shared posts

on social media under the #TheShowMustBePaused hashtag and expressed solidarity with the black community. Some record labels have promised not to release new music this week.

It’s not clear when the social media protests became labeled as Blackout Tuesday or when sharing a black screen became a sign of participation. Thomas and Agyemang stressed in their posts that they weren’t organizing a “24-hour initiative.” Said the pair: “We are and will be in this fight for the long haul.”

Black Lives Matter itself dates back to 2013, as a response to the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Hashtags associated with the movement are used for a range of purposes, from posts in solidarity to activists sharing information about attending protests to the documentation of police brutality.

As protests have spread across the US in response to the police killing of George Floyd, social media has provided an essential channel for both organizing demonstrations and sharing footage of police violence.

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Music Industry plans blackout day in support of George Floyd protests

Sharon Ross

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Music Industry plans blackout day in support of George Floyd protests

Apple Music is also participating, saying it cancelled its regular Beats 1 radio schedule and steering users toward a streaming station that celebrates the best in Black Music. It will also host a playlist designed to unite users, with regular intermissions explaining the protests and movement. Deezer and Tidal Music also tweeted support.

Meanwhile, event organizer Live Nation will close its offices today, while ViacomCBS channnels MTV, VH1 and Comedy Central will “go dark,” the company said. Def Jam Recordings, Interscope, Sony Music and others will also participate. Artists expressing support include Lady Gaga, the Rolling Stones, Quincy Jones and Billie Eilish.

However, some have criticized the day, saying it’s unfocused and doesn’t address the protests and Black Lives Matter movement directly. Don Giovanni Records owner Joe Steinhard told Rolling Stone that the movement is “misguided” and that labels should be supporting existing initiatives like Black Lives Matter. Others noted that the industry is sacrificing little for the blackout day, while Tony! Toni! Toné’s Raphael Saadiq said record labels should pay artists more.

It’s also unclear what level of action the labels are taking. While Columbia records said that today is “not a day off” but rather a way to reflect, Warner Music CEO Steve Cooper wrote that “everyone can take a day out from their jobs.” Some labels, including Capitol records, promised to make donations to black rights organizations, but haven’t provided specific calls to action for employees.

On their website, however, Thomas and Agyemang did address the industry’s inequality. “[It is] an industry that has “profited predominantly from black art,” the site states. “It is the obligation of these entities to protect and empower the black communities… in ways that are measurable and transparent. This is not just a 24 hour initiative. We are and will be in this fight for the long haul. A plan of action will be announced.”

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