Connect with us

World

Trump’s withdrawal from an obscure postal treaty may impact prices for consumers

Rhonda Palacios

Published

on

Trump's withdrawal from an obscure postal treaty may lead to higher prices for consumers

The deepening trade war with China has once again threatened to send consumer prices sharply upward. President Donald Trump has ordered the U.S. Postal Service to withdraw from a treaty setting the shipping rates with nearly 200 countries.

The 144-year-old treaty determines the rates paid by various countries for package delivery to customers in other nations. The treaty sets different tiers which make developed countries like the U.S. pay higher rates while the less developed countries get a discount. In a carryover from when China was not that much economically advanced as it is now, it is rated lower — which sometimes led to some major head scratching in the market.

Big companies like Amazon and FedEx have long taken issues with the treaty. They stressed on unfairly discounted shipping rates for foreign shippers.

The American manufacturers would be one of the beneficiaries of the new policy.  They have long advocated for the leveling of what they see as a very unfair playing field.

Mighty Mug was the the poster child of the movement which seemed to help overhaul the rates. It is a patented spill-proof travel coffee mug. It cost $6.30 for the U.S. company to ship by regular mail from New Jersey, the company CEO Jayme Smaldone wrote earlier this year in February. However a Chinese company that sold a knock-off version was able to ship it to the same location from 8,000 miles away for only $1.40.

Rhonda Palacios has travelled around the world has lived in as many as 7 countries. She loves travelling and knows everything that is going around the world. She contributes to World news on Report Door. You might see her driving her car without she knowing where is she destined to, as she just enjoys driving.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

World

Pakistan prime minister defends lifting lockdown, urges nation to ‘live with the virus’

Michael Leahy

Published

on

Pakistan prime minister defends lifting lockdown, urges nation to 'live with the virus'

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan on Monday cited economic losses to justify his government’s decision to lift a coronavirus lockdown despite rising infections and deaths, urging people to “live with the virus.”

A man wearing a protective face mask, rides a motor bike amidst road traffic, as the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in Karachi, Pakistan June 1, 2020. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Pakistan has rolled back almost all shutdown measures, primarily to avert an economic meltdown. The country would open to tourism but cinemas, theatres and schools remain closed.

The South Asian nation of 220 million has reported 72,160 novel coronavirus cases and 1,543 deaths, which jumped lately to as high as 80 a day.

Its economic losses included a decline in exports, a 30% shortfall in revenues and remittances were expected to fall in coming months, Khan said. With the fiscal deficit likely to rise as high as 9.4% and the revenue shortfall, Pakistan is facing a balance of payment crisis.

The country couldn’t afford to match the losses incurred during the lockdown as many other countries had done, Khan said in a televised address.

He cited 50 million people who live below the poverty line and 25 million daily wagers.

Khan said his government gave cash handouts to the poor, which wasn’t possible to continue on such a large scale, adding around 130 million to 150 million people were adversely affected by the shutdowns.

“Our conditions don’t allow that we keep feeding money to them, how long we can give them money,” Khan said.

He urged people to act responsibly but more infections and deaths were inevitable.

“This virus will spread more. I have to say it with regret that there will be more deaths,” Khan said. “If people do take care they can live with the virus.”

Reporting by Asif Shahzad; editing by Grant McCool

Continue Reading

World

Deaths from Storm Amanda rise to 20 in Central America

Michael Leahy

Published

on

Deaths from Storm Amanda rise to 20 in Central America

FILE PHOTO: Cars damaged by floods caused by Tropical Storm Amanda are seen in San Salvador, El Salvador May 31, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Cabezas

SAN SALVADOR (Reuters) – Torrential rains at the weekend caused by Tropical Storm Amanda have killed at least 20 people in Central America, authorities said on Monday, as remnants of the weather front moved north into Mexico and threatened to form a new cyclone.

The bulk of the victims were in El Salvador, where Amanda led to the deaths of 15 people and the disappearance of seven more, as well as destroying hundreds of homes and damaging roads, the National Commission for Civil Protection said.

Carolina Recinos, a senior aide to Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele, told a news conference that Amanda had dumped the equivalent of “almost 10 percent” of the annual rainfall on the country in a relatively short space of time.

In Guatemala, officials reported the deaths of two people due to the storm, including a boy of nine. The rains killed at least three people in Honduras, including a brother and sister swept into a river in a car, local authorities said.

By Monday afternoon, remnants of Amanda were on the western flank of Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula and expected to drift west into the Bay of Campeche, a major oil producing area, according to projections by the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC).

The weather front is likely to form a tropical depression later on Monday or by Tuesday, the Miami-based NHC said.

Reporting by Nelson Renteria; Additional reporting by Sofia Menchu in Guatemala City and Gustavo Palencia in Tegucigalpa; Editing by Alistair Bell

Continue Reading

World

Brazil House Speaker Maia says he will decide on impeachment at ‘appropriate time’

Michael Leahy

Published

on

Brazil House Speaker Maia says he will decide on impeachment at 'appropriate time'

FILE PHOTO: President of Brazil’s Lower House Rodrigo Maia attends a special comission of coronavirus at the Chamber of Deputies in Brasilia, Brazil March 11, 2020. REUTERS/Adriano Machado

BRASILIA (Reuters) – Rodrigo Maia, the speaker of Brazil’s lower house of Congress, said during an online event on Monday that he would decide whether to open impeachment proceedings against President Jair Bolsonaro at “the appropriate time.”

While Maia did not rule out opening such a proceeding, he said Brazil’s most pressing concern was unity in the face of the coronavirus outbreak, adding that he did not want to put “more wood in the fire.”

Reporting by Gabriel Ponte; Writing by Gram Slattery; Editing by Leslie Adler

Continue Reading

Trending