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Purebred dogs in Ukraine auctioned off to pay owner’s debts

Michael Leahy

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Purebred dogs in Ukraine auctioned off to pay owner’s debts

Ukrainians were stunned this week when two dogs who were confiscated from their owners were put up for auction to cover the owner’s debts.

The dogs — a pit bull and a German shepherd — were put up for auction on a state-owned online site for confiscated goods. The shepherd dog had a starting price of $48, according to the BBC.

While opposition members of parliament oppose the move, Justice Minister Denis Malyuska told BBC Ukrainian, “We really have to confiscate pets from their owners. Even though they are taken because of their former owners’ insolvency, often it turns out for the best when pets have been badly treated.”

Confiscated pets are often bought back by the owner or their relatives for a symbolic sum, Malyuska said, before suggesting “online dog auctions could be brought to an end, adding that he would buy one of the confiscated dogs himself.”

Michael Leahy has worked in various news organizations and now aims to make Report Door one of the best and fastest growing news websites in the U.S. He contributes to the US section. He loves going around different people in the US and loves meeting new people and making new friends.

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UConn murder suspect’s dad recently arrested for groping teen girl

Michael Leahy

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UConn murder suspect's dad recently arrested for groping teen girl

The father of the University of Connecticut student wanted in two murders was arrested last month for allegedly groping an underage teen girl he supplied booze to, a report said.

The alleged incident involving Robert Manfredonia, whose son Peter Manfredonia is still at large, occurred on April 10, the Connecticut Post reported, citing police.

The elder Manfredonia is accused of giving alcohol to two teen girls, then, when one of the girls left, he allegedly touched the other, according to an arrest warrant obtained by the paper.

One of the girls told authorities they also smoked weed, the report said.

Police charged the father, who’s free on $50,000 bond, with sexual assault, risk of injury to a minor and providing alcohol to a minor.

Robert Manfredonia declined to comment when reached by the paper.

His son, who was last seen Sunday in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, allegedly killed two men and seriously injured another in two separate attacks in Connecticut.

Peter Manfredonia’s family, through their attorney Michael Dolan, and authorities, have urged him to surrender.

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De Blasio signs bill capping NYC restaurant delivery-app fees

Michael Leahy

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De Blasio signs bill capping NYC restaurant delivery-app fees

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed several bills on Tuesday that could temporarily eat into the profits of food-ordering and delivery apps like Grubhub and UberEats.

Starting June 2, the commissions that food-delivery apps can charge Big Apple eateries will be capped at 20 percent — or 15 percent for delivery charges and 5 percent for any other fees. Such apps have been criticized for charging as much as 40 percent in some cases for orders they help generate and deliver.

Grubhub, which owns Seamless, will also be forced to stop charging restaurants fees for telephone orders that did not result in a take-out order. The Chicago firm has come under fire for charging restaurateurs for answering the phone, even when no order was placed, after The Post first reported on the practice last year.

The new laws will remain in effect for 90 days after New York’s state-of-emergency order is lifted.

Grubhub on Wednesday reiterated its previous statement that the commission cap is “arbitrary” and “will not withstand a legal challenge.”

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Catholic churches in NYC reopen with social-distancing measures

Michael Leahy

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Catholic churches in NYC reopen with social-distancing measures

Catholic churches in Brooklyn and Queens shuttered for months due to the coronavirus outbreak reopened on Tuesday with some changes — including social-distancing signage and mandatory masks.

Worshipers in protective face coverings flocked to pews, at a maximum of 10 at a time, and some were even spotted donning plastic gloves as they prayed.

Diocese of Brooklyn Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio gave his blessing for churches, closed since March 20, to open for private prayer and devotion, with 6-feet social-distancing regulations being maintained.

DiMarzio also granted permission to start holding funerals, baptisms and weddings, also with a strict maximum of 10 people and mandatory masks. Mass is still being streamed online.

At least two houses of worship, Immaculate Heart of Mary in Kensington and Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Sunset Park, plastered bright yellow police-style “CAUTION” tape to keep people a safe distance apart.

“I know it may look like a crime scene, or a construction site . . . but, it is a sign that light is at the end of the tunnel!” Immaculate Heart of Mary wrote on Facebook, announcing it will now be open daily from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for private prayer.

Numerous yellow warnings also reminded parishioners to “maintain social distancing” of at least 6 feet.

“Social Distancing is a MUST!” the church stressed on Facebook, outlining other rules including “sanitize your hands frequently” and “No Touching the Statues!”

At Our Lady of Perpetual Help, at least a dozen worshipers cycled through in just 30 minutes between 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., with a staffer escorting people to specific seats a safe distance apart.

Another church, Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph in Prospect Heights, used more subdued signs to split up seating areas, including for families, couples and those coming to pray on their own. They also tacked on blue tape to pews to the mark 6-feet distance.

The precautions are being taken “to provide atmosphere that everyone can feel safe coming to church,” said Msgr. Kieran Harrington, the rector at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph.

“Some people will be scared, and we want to let them see that the church is a place where you can feel safe to come and to pray and to be with others,” he told The Post.

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