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Missouri among states that conflated coronavirus test results: report

Michael Leahy

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Missouri among states that conflated coronavirus test results: report

The percentage of people coming up positive for the coronavirus in Missouri was artificially low because the state combined two kinds of testing results, according to a report.

The state was mixing the results of tests for the COVID-19 virus, which show active infection, with those from antibody testing, which demonstrate prior infection, the Kansas City Star reported.

State data as of Friday showed about 6.5 percent of tests were positive. But after separating the two types of tests, the data revealed 8.3 percent of tests for active infection were positive along with four percent of antibody tests, the newspaper reported.

Missouri has had more than 11,700 confirmed coronavirus cases, and more than 600 deaths.

Michael Leahy has worked in various news organizations and now aims to make Report Door one of the best and fastest growing news websites in the U.S. He contributes to the US section. He loves going around different people in the US and loves meeting new people and making new friends.

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Curfew won’t work in NYC amid George Floyd protests, looting: NYPD commissioner

Michael Leahy

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Curfew won’t work in NYC amid George Floyd protests, looting: NYPD commissioner

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea said Monday that a curfew won’t work in New York City amid escalating protests over George Floyd’s police-involved death in Minneapolis — and the National Guard won’t be necessary either.

In an appearance on NBC’s “Today” show, the top cop panned the idea of a curfew, which dozens of other cities have instituted.

“I’ll be honest….we could impose a curfew today,” Shea said. “The problem is, people need to listen to a curfew and that’s not going to happen, first and foremost. If people think it will, they don’t understand what’s going on.”

“The second point is, anyone who is on the street during this curfew…would probably already be arrested for five different offenses,” he added.

Chief of Department Terence Monahan also rejected the possibility of a curfew during a Monday morning appearance on Good Day New York.

“I don’t think we need it in New York,” Monahan said. “Our men and women in the NYPD are going to be out there, we’ve been out there each and every night. We’re going to be out there again. We’re going to continue to arrest those that are looking to cause mayhem in our streets.”

During a Sunday press briefing, Mayor Bill de Blasio also said there is “no plan” to impose a curfew on the city.

At least 40 cities across the US have imposed curfews but most were broken, CNN reported

.

During the “Today” show interview, Shea also said that “we don’t need the National Guard.”

National Guard members have been activated to contain ongoing demonstrations in at least 26 states and Washington, DC, according to CNN.

The Big Apple faced a fourth-straight night of violence and looting late Sunday into early Monday.

More than 200 people were arrested, a dozen department vehicles were vandalized and at least seven officers were injured, according to the NYPD.

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FBI, federal prison riot teams deployed to George Floyd protests

Michael Leahy

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FBI, federal prison riot teams deployed to George Floyd protests

The FBI is deploying rescue teams to help local authorities quell violence from George Floyd protests, as federal involvement in the demonstrations begins to grow, according to reports.

Attorney General William Barr said Monday that the FBI’s elite Hostage Rescue Unit and federal prison riot teams were being sent to Miami and Washington DC after a sixth day of nationwide protests over Floyd’s Memorial Day death, USA Today reported

.

Meanwhile, the FBI has set up command posts at local field offices throughout the country, a senior Department of Justice official told CNN.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement also deployed special response teams nationwide to help with the protests, the network reported.

“In light of civil unrest taking place across the country, ICE personnel and Special Response Teams have been deployed to protect agency facilities and assets in support of the Federal Protective Service and assist local, state and federal law enforcement partners, as needed,” the agency told CNN in a statement.

The announcements come as thousands of demonstrators continue to take to the streets to protests Floyd’s police custody death in Minneapolis.

Dozens of cities have now been hit by protests, with violence and mass arrests in Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Miami, and New York, among others. More than two dozen states have activated National Guard troops, and curfews are in place in more than two dozen cities and states.

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U.S. EPA moves to curb state powers to deny permits for energy projects

Michael Leahy

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U.S. EPA moves to curb state powers to deny permits for energy projects

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler signed on Monday a rule limiting state powers to block energy infrastructure projects, setting up a fight with some Democratic governors who say Washington is stripping their ability to protect their states’ interests and combat climate change.

FILE PHOTO: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler testifies at a hearing titled ‘Oversight of the Environmental Protection Agency’ in the Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington, DC, U.S., May 20, 2020. Kevin Dietsch/Pool via REUTERS/File Photo

The move comes as the Trump administration grows increasingly frustrated with left-leaning states like California and Washington that it says have misused their authority under the U.S. Clean Water Act to halt fossil fuel projects like pipelines and coal terminals.

Under the rule, first proposed in August, the EPA will alter Section 401 of the federal water law to make it impossible for a state to block a water permit for a project for any reason other than direct pollution into state waters. It will also set a one-year deadline for states to approve projects.

In the past, states have weighed broader factors, such as climate change, to determine quality and have taken years to make decisions on projects.

New Jersey and New York both denied a 401 permit to the Williams Co. $1 billion Northeast Supply Enhancement pipeline project, citing both water quality and climate change concerns.

Wheeler said the change would prevent states from holding “our nation’s energy infrastructure projects hostage,” deterring investors.

“You won’t be able to use 401 in the future, citing climate change,” Wheeler said.

Interstate pipelines, coal terminals and other projects cannot proceed without a state agreeing to a water permit or waiving its authority to issue a certification.

Several states, including Washington, have hinted that they would take legal action against the EPA if it moves to curtail state authority under the Clean Water Act.

“The Trump Administration’s proposed rule would usurp state and tribal authority to regulate our waters, in violation of the law,” Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said after submitting comments in October.

Washington denied a section 401 permit in 2017, effectively blocking the construction of a coal export terminal that would have allowed western U.S. coal to be transported to Asia.

The American Petroleum Institute, which has criticized states like New York for blocking pipeline construction, praised the new rule.

Reporting by Valerie Volcovici; Editing by Steve Orlofsky and Aurora Ellis

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