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Missing Ohio teen found, wanted ‘to start a new life’

Michael Leahy

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Missing Ohio teen found, wanted 'to start a new life'

An Ohio teenager missing since Sunday was found safe, telling authorities she vanished “to start a new life.”

Madison Bell, 18, of Greenfield, was last seen around 10:30 a.m. on May 17, when she told her mother she was heading to a tanning salon that had just reopened after coronavirus restrictions were lifted.

“She yelled, ‘I’m going to go tan. I’ll be right back,’ and I was like, ‘OK, be careful,’” said her mom, Melissa Bell.

But Madison never showed up at her tanning appointment. Her car was found in a church parking lot. The car was unlocked with her phone inside and the keys still in the ignition.

Her mom told authorities she did not believe her daughter left alone.

On Saturday, law enforcement officials tracked her down, but found no wrongdoing.

“Bell has been located safe and left on her own free will,” Sheriff Donnie Barrera said.

The graduating senior left home “to start a new life,” according to Barrera, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported reported.  He said officers found her at a distant location.

Her family asked for privacy “during this difficult time while we are emotionally raw.”

“We are just relieved to know Maddie is alive and not in physical danger,” they added.

The family thanked local search-and-rescue teams as well as community volunteers from throughout the region who joined in a massive search for the missing teen.

Michael Leahy has worked in various news organizations and now aims to make Report Door one of the best and fastest growing news websites in the U.S. He contributes to the US section. He loves going around different people in the US and loves meeting new people and making new friends.

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George Floyd died of ‘asphyxia to neck’: family ME’s report

Michael Leahy

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George Floyd died of 'asphyxia to neck': family ME's report

George Floyd was killed by “asphyxia due to neck and back compression” — and died at the scene, according to an independent medical examiner’s report released Monday.

“Sustained pressure on the right side of Mr. Floyd’s carotid artery impeded blood flow to the brain, and weight on his back impeded his ability to breathe,” said the report by medical examiners hired by Floyd’s family and obtained by the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

“The independent examiners found that weight on the back, handcuffs and positioning were contributory factors because they impaired Mr. Floyd’s diaphragm to function.

“From all the evidence, the doctors said it now appears Mr. Floyd died at the scene.”

A preliminary official autopsy said Floyd died from the combined effects of being restrained, possible intoxicants and underlying health issues including heart disease, Minnesota officials have said.

Floyd, who is black, died May 25 after having his neck knelt on by a white Minnesota cop for nine minutes, even as he cried, “I can’t breathe.”

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U.S. health experts, officials warn protests may add to virus spread

Michael Leahy

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U.S. health experts, officials warn protests may add to virus spread

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Public health experts and government officials, including New York’s governor, are warning that large street protests over racial inequities and excessive police force could worsen the spread of the novel coronavirus.

FILE PHOTO: People take part in a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 31, 2020. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

The protests over the death of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, in police custody in Minneapolis last Monday, have spread to cities including New York, Los Angeles, and Baltimore.

They are bringing together hundreds, sometimes thousands, of people just as the country is reopening after lengthy lockdowns to stop the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

“We’re talking about reopening in one week in New York City and now we’re seeing these mass gatherings over the past several nights that could in fact exacerbate the COVID-19 spread,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Monday.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms recommended to Georgians that if they were at a protest, they should consider being tested for COVID-19.

Health experts say the close proximity of participants, running and yelling or chanting, may increase transmission because people emit more respiratory droplets under these conditions.

Conversely, the protests have largely been outside, where motion of the air from breezes or people moving quickly can diffuse the virus, said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

“A lot of people were wearing masks. That will also help dampen the possibility of spread,” he said.

If there are infections, alerting people that they have been near someone with the virus will be difficult, especially if people do not want it known they attended a protest, he and other experts said.

More public health officials may start to make statements to the effect of, “‘If you were at one of these protests, you should consider yourself exposed,’” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

Reporting by Caroline Humer; additional reporting by Maria Caspani in New York; editing by Lewis Krauskopf and Tom Brown

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Accused Molotov cocktail tosser has long rap sheet: prosecutors

Michael Leahy

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Accused Molotov cocktail tosser has long rap sheet: prosecutors

She’s been arrested ‘olotov times.

The Catskill woman who was arrested for allegedly tossing a Molotov cocktail at a filled police van in Brooklyn Friday night has a lengthy rap sheet that includes collars in 11 separate states, federal authorities said Monday.

Samantha Shader’s arrest history includes a bust in January 2019 for interfering with a police officer in Waterford, Connecticut, federal prosecutors said in a detention memo Monday.

She was also convicted in February 2017 for possession of a controlled substance in Shawnee, Oklahoma, and sentenced to 90 days in jail, authorities said. In 2013, she was busted in Austin, Texas, for assault.

In arguing to detain her, prosecutors said none of her previous arrests have stopped her from traveling the country and committing more crimes.

The convictions haven’t stopped her “from escalating her crimes to the point where her actions could have seriously injured or killed four police officers and numerous bystanders in the vicinity of where she threw the Molotov cocktail,” they added.

A spokesperson for the Eastern District of New York declined to say if any of her previous arrests were related to protests.

Shader, 27, allegedly lit a Molotov cocktail near Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue and threw it at an NYPD van with four cops inside.

The bottle shattered two of the vehicle’s windows as four cops sat inside — but the gas inside did not ignite because toilet paper was used instead of a rag, a police source previously told The Post.

The NYPD initially pressed for attempted-murder charges against her, but federal prosecutors took over the case and have charged her with damaging a police vehicle, which carries a maximum sentence of 20 years.

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