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Gov. Bill Walker Drops Out Of Alaska Gubernatorial Race 18 Days Before Election

Michael Leahy

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Gov. Bill Walker Drops Out Of Alaska Gubernatorial Race 18 Days Before Election

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker (I) on Friday suspended his re-election campaign.

Walker, an independent, initially announced the news at an Alaska Federation of Natives conference. He later elaborated on his decision in an Instagram post.

Walker wrote in the post, every decision that he made as a governor, he made it on the basis of what he believes is best for Alaska and with that said, effective today, he is suspending his campaign for re-election as Governor.

He added that with more time, he is confident that Lieutenant Gov. Valerie Davidson and he could deliver a message and a campaign that could earn a victory in this election, but there are only 18 days remaining before election day and in the time remaining, he believes they cannot win a three-way race.

Walker’s departure has set up a tight competition between former U.S. Sen. Mark Begich (D) and former state Sen. Mike Dunleavy (R).

His announcement comes only three days after the state’s lieutenant governor, Byron Mallott (D), resigned abruptly due to unspecified “inappropriate comments.”

Davidson had hinted at a press conference that Mallott’s comments might have been related to women.

Michael Leahy has worked in various news organizations and now aims to make Report Door one of the best and fastest growing news websites in the U.S. He contributes to the US section. He loves going around different people in the US and loves meeting new people and making new friends.

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U.S. lawmaker prepares bill aiming to end court protection for police

Michael Leahy

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U.S. lawmaker prepares bill aiming to end court protection for police

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Representative Justin Amash (I-MI), recently having left the Republican Party after voicing support for an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, departs after a series of votes at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. July 10, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – With cities across America in turmoil over the death of George Floyd, a U.S. lawmaker plans to introduce legislation this week that he hopes will end a pattern of police violence by allowing victims to sue officers for illegal and unconstitutional acts.

U.S. Representative Justin Amash, a conservative independent from Michigan, won support from a Minneapolis Democrat on Monday for his “Ending Qualified Immunity Act,” which would allow civil lawsuits against police, a recourse that the Supreme Court has all but done away with.

The high court’s adoptihere of the qualified immunity doctrine has largely shielded police from having to pay financial settlements to victims or grieving families. The doctrine increasingly protects cops even when courts determine that officers violate civil rights, a Reuters investigation showed here

“The brutal killing of George Floyd is merely the latest in a long line of incidents of egregious police misconduct,” Amash told colleagues in a letter on Sunday. “This pattern continues because police are legally, politically and culturally insulated … That must change so that these incidents stop happening.”

Representative Ilhan Omar, a Minneapolis Democrat, intends to back the bill, according to an aide. Amash aims to introduce it on Thursday, an aide said. It was unclear whether the legislation would gain support from the Congressional Black Caucus, which is leading discussions on a response to police violence.

Amash’s bill joins a flurry of Democratic legislation in the House of Representatives and Senate, as lawmakers seek ways to respond to Floyd’s death a week ago. A black man, Floyd died after pleading for his life as a white Minneapolis policeman kneeled on his neck.

Protesters angered by Floyd’s death and racial inequities have demonstrated for six straight nights. Dozens of cities are under curfews following violence.

Republicans have condemned Floyd’s killing and voiced support for peaceful protests, but have largely steered clear of criticizing or echoing President Donald Trump’s harsh rhetoric toward violent protesters.

Republican Senator Tom Cotton on Monday tweeted that Trump should use the Insurrection Act to deploy active-duty military forces to cities to “ensure this violence ends tonight.”

Reporting by David Morgan, Richard Cowan and Susan Heavey; editing by Grant McCool

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George Floyd died of ‘asphyxia to neck’: family ME’s report

Michael Leahy

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George Floyd died of 'asphyxia to neck': family ME's report

George Floyd was killed by “asphyxia due to neck and back compression” — and died at the scene, according to an independent medical examiner’s report released Monday.

“Sustained pressure on the right side of Mr. Floyd’s carotid artery impeded blood flow to the brain, and weight on his back impeded his ability to breathe,” said the report by medical examiners hired by Floyd’s family and obtained by the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

“The independent examiners found that weight on the back, handcuffs and positioning were contributory factors because they impaired Mr. Floyd’s diaphragm to function.

“From all the evidence, the doctors said it now appears Mr. Floyd died at the scene.”

A preliminary official autopsy said Floyd died from the combined effects of being restrained, possible intoxicants and underlying health issues including heart disease, Minnesota officials have said.

Floyd, who is black, died May 25 after having his neck knelt on by a white Minnesota cop for nine minutes, even as he cried, “I can’t breathe.”

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U.S. health experts, officials warn protests may add to virus spread

Michael Leahy

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U.S. health experts, officials warn protests may add to virus spread

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Public health experts and government officials, including New York’s governor, are warning that large street protests over racial inequities and excessive police force could worsen the spread of the novel coronavirus.

FILE PHOTO: People take part in a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 31, 2020. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

The protests over the death of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, in police custody in Minneapolis last Monday, have spread to cities including New York, Los Angeles, and Baltimore.

They are bringing together hundreds, sometimes thousands, of people just as the country is reopening after lengthy lockdowns to stop the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

“We’re talking about reopening in one week in New York City and now we’re seeing these mass gatherings over the past several nights that could in fact exacerbate the COVID-19 spread,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Monday.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms recommended to Georgians that if they were at a protest, they should consider being tested for COVID-19.

Health experts say the close proximity of participants, running and yelling or chanting, may increase transmission because people emit more respiratory droplets under these conditions.

Conversely, the protests have largely been outside, where motion of the air from breezes or people moving quickly can diffuse the virus, said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

“A lot of people were wearing masks. That will also help dampen the possibility of spread,” he said.

If there are infections, alerting people that they have been near someone with the virus will be difficult, especially if people do not want it known they attended a protest, he and other experts said.

More public health officials may start to make statements to the effect of, “‘If you were at one of these protests, you should consider yourself exposed,’” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

Reporting by Caroline Humer; additional reporting by Maria Caspani in New York; editing by Lewis Krauskopf and Tom Brown

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