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Give a special touch to the Wedding flowers

Steve Murphy

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wedding flowers

The wedding day is indeed a huge day in anyone’s life. That is exactly what makes it one of the important days that you would want to plan everything in the best possible manner. From the perspective, wedding flowers should ideally be one of the essentials points you want to plan meticulously.

Why would you need to use flowers on a wedding day? Well, the flowers would ideally the best option to go with the theme of the dress or fashion that the bride may have decided to climb up the aisle with. There are several ways you would want to personalize your wedding experience. The wedding bouquets on the wedding day would further add up more value to you.

Your wedding is a once in a lifetime experience for most of us. That is exactly why it would need extra attention. There are several occasions throughout the wedding ceremony that you would want to decorate in its unique way. You can explore as many ways as you can to arrive at the best floral combinations for your wedding occasion.

If you think you are lost for choice and cannot take the right call, there are several experts who can assist you in your endeavor. Spearwood Florist is one of the excellent options for the purpose. You can visit the website

of their services to get more information.

Just make sure that you are choosing your florist with utmost care. Communicating with the experts would be one of the best choices you would go with.

Steve Murphy has handled various businesses throughout his career and has a deep domain knowledge. He founded Report Door in an attempt to bring the latest news to its readers. He is glued to the stock market most of the times and just loves being in touch with the developments in the business world.

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Judge tosses ex-basketball players’ ‘Fortnite’ dance lawsuit

Michael Leahy

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Judge tosses ex-basketball players’ ‘Fortnite’ dance lawsuit

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit in which two former University of Maryland men’s basketball players accused makers of the “Fortnite” video game of misappropriating a dance move that the ex-teammates popularized.

US District Judge Paul Grimm in Maryland ruled Friday that the Copyright Act preempts claims that Jared Nickens and Jaylen Brantley filed in February 2019 against Epic Games, creator of the popular online shooting game.

Nickens and Brantley claimed the Cary, North Carolina-based company misappropriated their identities by digitally copying the “Running Man Challenge” dance that they performed in social media videos and on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” in 2016.

Their copyright infringement lawsuit claimed the “Running Man” dance “emote” that Fortnite players can purchase for their characters is identical to the dance that Nickens and Brantley took credit for creating.

The judge said the key question is whether plaintiffs have a claim that is “qualitatively different” from the rights protected by the Copyright Act.

“And here Plaintiffs claim is based on Epic Games allegedly ‘capturing and digitally copying’ the Running Man dance to create the Fortnite emote that ‘allows the player’s avatars to execute the Running Man identically to Plaintiffs’ version.’ This is squarely within the rights protected by the Copyright Act,” he wrote.

Brantley, of Springfield, Mass., and Nickens, of Monmouth Junction, NJ, were seeking more than $5 million in damages.

Epic Games spokesman Nick Chester declined to comment Monday on the judge’s ruling.

Celebratory dances in Fortnite are called “emotes.” While the game itself is free to play, players can purchase the “emotes” and other character customizations.

Other artists, including Brooklyn-based rapper 2 Milly and “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” star Alfonso Ribeiro, also have sued Epic Games over other dances depicted in the shooting game. Ribeiro dropped his lawsuit against Epic Games last year after the US Copyright Office denied him a copyright for the “Carlton” dance that his character performed on the 1990s sitcom.

Nickens and Brantley appeared on DeGeneres’ talk show alongside two New Jersey high school students who were posting videos of the dance online before the two University of Maryland basketball players filmed their own version. Brantley told DeGeneres that Nickens first showed him the dance in a video on Instagram.

“We dance every day for our teammates in the locker room,” Brantley said. “We were like, ‘Hey, let’s make a video and make everybody laugh.’”

One of their dance videos has millions of views on Instagram, YouTube and Facebook, their lawsuit said.

The judge dismissed their lawsuit’s claims for invasion of privacy, unfair competition and unjust enrichment based on preemption under the Copyright Act. He also threw out their trademark claims and claims accusing the company of unfair competition and “false designation of origin” under the Lanham Act.

“Plaintiffs seek to place the same square peg into eight round holes in search of a cause of action against Epic Games for its use of the Running Man dance in its game Fortnite. But Plaintiffs’ claims that Epic Games copied the dance do not support any of their theories,” the judge wrote.

Nickens was playing professional basketball in Canada and Brantley was working as a sports agent when they sued last year, according to Richard Jaklitsch, one of their attorneys. Jaklitsch didn’t immediately respond Monday to an e-mail seeking comment.

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Stocks register gains on cautious hopes of economic recovery

Michael Leahy

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Stocks register gains on cautious hopes of economic recovery

US stocks rebounded Monday as Wall Street cautiously bet on an economic recovery despite mounting unrest over police brutality and continued tensions with China.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose as much as 93.12 points, or 0.3 percent, to 25,476.23, after shedding 0.5 percent at the open.

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq similarly clawed back early losses in choppy trading to rise as much as 0.2 and 0.5 percent, respectively.

Wall Street appeared focused on the prospects of the economy shaking off the coronavirus crisis despite a weekend of violent protests across the nation sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

“History shows effectively no correlation between social, political turmoil and stock markets,” said David Trainer, CEO of investment research firm New Constructs. He noted that the market posted a significant gain in 1968, a year marred by civil unrest and two major political assassinations.

Investors also shrugged off China’s Monday threat of retaliation against President Trump’s move to start ending the US’s special trade relationship with Hong Kong after Beijing moved to restrict the territory’s autonomy.

The protests and China tensions “just get dwarfed by the fact that the economy everywhere is coming back online, and I just don’t know how the market moves away from that,” said Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at the Minneapolis-based Leuthold Group.

Some recent economic data has suggested that the US economy is starting to turn around after the coronavirus pandemic sparked the worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Reports released Monday showed manufacturing activity improving last month in both the US and China as the world emerged from lockdowns aimed at controlling the virus. New jobless claims in the US have also fallen steadily in recent weeks, though Friday’s monthly jobs report is expected to show unemployment at or near 20 percent.

Optimism about an economic reopening has helped spur a significant rally on Wall Street since March, when the virus crisis tanked global markets. The S&P ended May just about 10.3 percent below its all-time high reached in February.

With Post wires

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Coty shakes off Kylie Jenner problem, surges after KKR buys stake

Michael Leahy

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Coty shakes off Kylie Jenner problem, surges after KKR buys stake

That was one quick makeover.

After getting dinged last week for its ties to Kylie Jenner, beauty products seller Coty announced a $1 billion investment and a management shakeup — sending the stock up 20 percent, to $4.36, in early-afternoon trading.

Coty on Monday said buyout firm KKR will be acquiring a 60 percent stake in Coty’s hair and nail brands, including Wella, Clairol and OPI, in a deal that values the business at $4.3 billion.

The news added some much-needed sheen to Coty’s stock, which plummeted 13 percent on Friday after Forbes accused Kylie Jenner of lying to the press about her wealth, including the financial success of her Kylie Cosmetics business. Coty bought a 51 percent stake in Kylie Cosmetics for $600 million in November with plans to use her social media following to better sell to young people.

Jenner has denied the allegations, including that she presented forged financial information when meeting with the magazine known for its wealth rankings to make herself look richer. The parent company of CoverGirl and Kylie Cosmetics also named Coty’s chairman, Peter Harf, as CEO — its fourth chief executive barely four years amid declining sales. Harf had previously been CEO from 1990 to 2001.

Harf’s appointment was unexpected because the company in February said former Jimmy Choo executive Pierre Denis would assume the reins at the end of May, succeeding Pierre Laubies.

The reason for the change is unclear but the company said Denis, who also resigned from the board, will remain as an adviser to the company as it embarks on a mission to shave its expenses by 25 percent.

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