Do the Consumption of Soft Drinks Increases the Risk of Osteoporosis in Women?

Osteoarthritis is characterized by progressively weak and brittle bones which mostly affect older adults. It reduces a person’s bone density and increases the risk of fractures. This condition is not new among people and already affected more than 150 million people worldwide.

A recent study has identified a connection between the consumption of soft drinks and an increased risk of osteoporosis in women. This affects mostly postmenopausal women. However, the study authors cannot prove causation, so call for more research.

According to the author of the most recent study paper, on an average every 3 seconds an osteoporotic fracture occurs.

Now the question arises “why soda”?

According to older studies, there is some link between consuming soft drinks and low bone mineral density. However, other studies looked for an association between soda and osteoporosis but didn’t find any specific relationship.

Because of these discrepancies, scientists took data from the Women’s Health Initiative. A national ongoing study suggests that it involves 161,808 postmenopausal women. Out of which for the new analysis, the researchers used data from 72,342 of these participants.

As part of the study, the participants provided detailed health information outlining lifestyle factors. This includes the diet questionnaire included questions about their intake of caffeinated and caffeine-free soft drinks.

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Finally, they did observe a relationship between soda consumption and osteoporosis-related injury. According to researchers, the link was only statistically significant for caffeine-free sodas, which produced a 32% increase in risk.

The comparison was made between the women who drank at least two drinks soda per day with those who drank none. So, the scientists found no links between soda consumption and bone mineral density.