Curtis Sliwa to submit for ‘Animal Welfare’ on NYC mayoral ballot

Big Apple pooches have a Guardian Angel.

Republican mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa announced Tuesday that he had collected enough signatures for the new Animal Welfare party line to appear on the ballot in the November election in New York City.

“We are going to force the issue in the general election,” the Guardian Angels founder said at a press conference outside the Board of Election headquarters in downtown Manhattan.

“No dog, no cat, no animal will be killed in the shelter system in the city of New York. They will be adopted out.”

Sliwa — known for his high-profile stunts like riding the subway for 24 hours to make a point about crime and burning face masks to highlight the new CDC guidance — said that candidates running on the ballot line would indicate their support for banning kill shelters.

Mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa delivers 5,000 signed petitions advocating for animal welfare with his wife, Nancy (left) outside the Board of Elections headquarters on 42 Broadway.
Mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa delivers 5,000 signed petitions advocating for animal welfare with his wife, Nancy (left), outside the Board of Election headquarters at 42 Broadway.
Steven Vago

“This animal welfare line never before done here, or anywhere throughout the United States, will stand for one issue and one issue alone,” said Sliwa, who was joined by his 13-year-old pug-beagle rescue, Lola.

Mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa carries a large stack of 5,000 signed petitions.
Mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa carries a large stack of 5,000 signed petitions.
Steven Vago

Sliwa, who said he currently has 15 rescue cats in his apartment, blasted current policies that allow shelters to euthanize strays if they’re not claimed within 72 hours.

Mayoral Republican candidate Curtis Sliwa poses with his wife, Nancy, and their cat, Tiger along with their dog, Lola.
Republican mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa poses with his wife, Nancy, and their cat Tiger along with a rescue named dog Lola.
Steven Vago

“We’re destined to save the dogs and cats of our city … No slaughter, no euthanization any longer in the shelter system of New York City that cost us millions of dollars,” said Sliwa.