Colin Kaepernick needs to be signed by NFL team: Carlos Hyde

The NFL’s statement on racism and fighting social injustice was one thing. Now, Carlos Hyde wants to see some action behind the talk.

The Seahawks running back knows how the league can back up that video by commissioner Roger Goodell: bring back Colin Kaepernick, who remains unsigned since protesting police brutality in 2016 by taking a knee during the national anthem in his final year in San Francisco.

“I think the NFL can start by signing Kap back,” Hyde told reporters about the quarterback. “I think if they sign Kap back, that’ll show that they’re really trying to move in a different direction. Because Kap was making a statement four years ago about what’s going on in today’s world and the NFL didn’t bother to listen to him then, so I think they should start by doing that. After that, I’m not really sure what the NFL can do.”

After being called out in a video by star players, Goodell responded last week amid social unrest and nationwide protests in the country following the police-related death of black man George Floyd. Goodell said in a video released on social media that the NFL condemns “racism and the systematic oppression of black people” and admitted it was “wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier.” That was a reference to certain teams prohibiting players from kneeling during the national anthem.

“Things definitely need to change, so I agree 100 percent what they were saying,” Hyde said, alluding to the video that included Saquon Barkley, Odell Beckham Jr. and Patrick Mahomes, among others.

Carlos Hyde and Colin Kaepernick in 2016
Carlos Hyde and Colin Kaepernick in 2016Getty Images

The 32-year-old Kaepernick is still working out hard and “is in the best shape of his life,” according to TMZ. He hasn’t played football since opting out of his contract with the 49ers in March of 2017. Hyde played with Kaepernick from 2014-16 in San Francisco and supported his peaceful protests.

“I was all for it,” Hyde said. “I understand the message he was putting out. I understood because I came from Cincinnati, Ohio. Lincoln Heights in Cincinnati, it’s not the best area, and I would see that — police brutality, pretty much everybody in the neighborhood is struggling, you see violence, drugs, all that. There’s just no opportunity there.”

Hyde was skeptical about how much the NFL can change the state of race relations in this country. But he does know it has the power with one move that would create some noise.

“I just know they can sign Kap,” he said.